7 Ways to Use Task Cards

Task cards are becoming a widely used instructional and practice tool in classrooms all over the world. They are versatile, great for centers or interventions, can be used as an early finisher activity, and even sub plans. But how exactly can task cards be used in the classroom? There are many ways to use task cards! Here are seven ideas!

1. Small Groups (Teacher Directed)

The first time students are introduced to task cards I would suggest that they are done under teacher supervision and direction. Small groups is a great option. The teacher shows the students one task card and the students solve the task card on their own white board or Toothy mat.

The first time students are introduced to task cards I would suggest that they are done under teacher supervision and direction.  Small groups is a great option.  The teacher shows the students one task card and the students solve the task card on their own white board or Toothy mat.

2. Small Groups (Self Paced)

Once students understand how to use task cards, another great option would be self paced within a small group. This could be at the teacher table or as an independent center. Each student would have their own set of cards to work through. It’s best to have task cards that have the answers on the back to allow for students to be 100% self paced, independent, and able to check their answers for accuracy.

Each student would have their own set of cards to work through.  It's best to have task cards that have the answers on the back to allow for students to be 100% self paced, independent, and able to check their answers for accuracy.

3. Partner Games

Students love to use task cards as a partner game. Again, it’s ideal if the answers are on the back of the cards for self-checking, instant feedback purposes. Students take turns choosing a card, both students solve, compare answers, and then check for accuracy.

Students love to use task cards as a partner game.  Again, it's ideal if the answers are on the back of the cards for self-checking, instant feedback purposes.  Students take turns choosing a card, both students solve, compare answers, and then check for accuracy.

4. Scoot

Scoot is fun because it gets kids up and moving. When playing scoot, the teacher sets a task card on each desk or table spot around the classroom. Each student has a clipboard and recording sheet. They start at their own spot and answer the task card by writing the answer on the recording sheet. The teacher has a signal that alerts the students when it is time to switch to the next desk. The game continues until the students have made it to every task card in the classroom. The recording sheets can be turned in to be corrected or corrected together with the teacher.

Scoot is fun because it gets kids up and moving.  When playing scoot, the teacher sets a task card on each desk or table spot around the classroom.  Each student has a clipboard and recording sheet.  They start at their own spot and answer the task card by writing the answer on the recording sheet.  The teacher has a signal that alerts the students when it is time to switch to the next desk.

5. Hang Around the Room

This would be another way to get students up and moving. The teacher hangs the task cards around the perimeter of the classroom at eye level. Another option would be to hide the task cards and treat it like a scavenger hunt. The students each have a recording sheet and clip board and move freely around the classroom finding task cards to solve.

This would be another way to get students up and moving.  The teacher hangs the task cards around the perimeter of the classroom at eye level.  Another option would be to hide the task cards and treat it like a scavenger hunt.  The students each have a recording sheet and clip board and move freely around the classroom finding task cards to solve.

6. Board Games

All students love board games so this option is always a hit! Checkers, Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, Connect Four, Monopoly, etc are all great games to play with task cards. The rules for these games stay the same but there is one added element. The student needs to solve a task card and present the answer to the rest of the players before taking their turn at the game.

Board games are a practical way to implement activities into your math centers. This 2nd grade teacher explains how she uses board games to get her students to work on their math fact fluency during math centers in both 1st grade and 2nd grade.

7. Notebooks

The last option would be to place the task cards into a notebook. Each task card acts like a flip flap in an interactive notebook. The cards get printed on white paper and cut out by the students. The answers get written underneath the task card after it’s been glued down to the notebook.

Task cards are becoming a widely used instructional and practice tool in classrooms all over the world.  They are versatile, great for centers or interventions, can be used as an early finisher activity, and even sub plans.  But how exactly can task cards be used in the classroom?  There are many ways to use task cards!  Here are seven ideas! #taskcards

Free Reading Task Cards

Self Correcting Task Cards are Key

As mentioned above, self correcting task cards are key because they allow for the students to be completely independent, self paced, and they receive instant feedback on whether or not they are solving the problem correctly. We have a variety of task cards for grades K-3 below!

Task cards are becoming a widely used instructional and practice tool in classrooms all over the world.  They are versatile, great for centers or interventions, can be used as an early finisher activity, and even sub plans.  But how exactly can task cards be used in the classroom?  There are many ways to use task cards!  Here are seven ideas! #taskcards

3 Comments

  1. L. Herrington

    These we’re wonderful ideas to use in my class.

    Reply
  2. Kim

    My kids love Toothy!

    Reply
  3. Lydia

    Excellent! Just what I need at this time of the school year. Thank you for refreshing and re-energizing our literacy centers.

    Reply

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Welcome, I’m Angie!

Hello there! I’m Angie Olson- a teacher, curriculum developer, educational blogger and owner of Lucky Little Learners.

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