Using Exit Tickets to Differentiate Instruction

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups.

Exit Tickets Explained

Exit tickets are a quick way to check for understanding. They are a 2-3 minute quick check that focuses on one skill at a time. Typically, there are anywhere from 2-6 problems on a well designed exit ticket.

Checking for Understanding

Students are given an exit ticket at the end of a lesson. Students know that the exit ticket is not graded for their report card. This brings down the level of test anxiety and provides a true glimpse into exactly where the student is at with their understanding of the skill.

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups. #1stgrade #2ndgrade #3rdgrade #exittickets

Gathering Data

Once students finish their exit ticket, the teacher takes a quick look at each one. The tickets get placed into three piles.

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups. #1stgrade #2ndgrade #3rdgrade #exittickets
  • Group 1: skill mastered-ready for an independent activity
  • Group 2: some understanding-needs a little extra reteaching
  • Group 3: no understanding-needs a small group intervention

Differentiating Instruction

Group 1 Students

The day after giving an exit ticket to the class is typically for the differentiated instruction. The students from pile 1 are going to complete a math center independently.

Group 2 Students

Group 2 students are going to get a brief reteaching on the skill and then can go into the math centers but the math centers will be done with a partner.

Group 3 Students

Group 3 students will receive a small group intervention with the teacher. This may involve some manipulative to help reteach the concept in a different way. This group should only be anywhere from 1-5 students.

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups. #1stgrade #2ndgrade #3rdgrade #exittickets

Designing Exit Tickets

A good exit ticket is going to have very specific components. It will list the skill that is being assessed. It will focus on one targeted skill. The skill will be aligned to your math standards. The exit ticket will offer at least two opportunities or problems to complete. There will also be a place for the student to self reflect on how they feel about the skill. This allows the teacher to understand how confident the student is feeling about the concept. Finally, a good exit ticket will have several versions of the exit ticket for each skill taught throughout the year to allow for multiple opportunities to demonstrate understanding.

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups. #1stgrade #2ndgrade #3rdgrade #exittickets

Don’t want to create these from scratch? We offer these exit tickets with every single component explained above in three grade levels.

The Benefits

There are many benefits to using exit tickets in your classroom. First, they are quick and easy to use. Next, students who have mastered the skill don’t have to continue to receive instruction, rather can use their understanding to reinforce the skill through a hands-on and engaging activity. Also, they provide reassurance to the teacher that they are delivering precise and targeted instruction to those who need it. Last, students are getting the instruction that is best for them. Less students are going to “fall through the cracks” with math exit tickets guiding your instruction and lesson planning.

Exit tickets are a snapshot for the teacher to gain quick understanding of exactly where each student is at when it comes to mastery of a skill. Exit tickets are a great tool to use to determine the pathway of instruction. They can also be used to help group students into flexible groups. #1stgrade #2ndgrade #3rdgrade #exittickets

4 Comments

  1. Teresa

    I love your fun stuff! Even though I am a Dyslexia specialist, I have followed you for years for ideas. Do you have a template that I can use to make my own exit tickets for Dyslexia intervention?

    Reply
    • Angie Olson

      Hi Theresa!
      Thank you so much for your sweet words about my products, I so appreciate it! Unfortunately, I do not have a template right now, But I will add it to my list of possibilities for the future! Thank you again!

      Angie Olson
      Lucky Little Learners

      Reply
  2. Jennie

    I think these are amazing! Is there any chance you will be creating these for Kindergarten?!?! Please!

    Reply
    • Angie Olson

      Hi Jennie!
      I so appreciate you taking the time to message me with your great suggestion. I will add it to my list and do my best to get to it. Have a great day!

      Angie Olson
      Lucky Little Learners

      Reply

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Welcome, I’m Angie!

Hello there! I’m Angie Olson- a teacher, curriculum developer, educational blogger and owner of Lucky Little Learners.

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